You finally scheduled the surgery your doctor told you about months ago. You walk into the pre-op room nervous and just ready for it to be over. They wheel you to the OR and put you under and once the surgery is over you are relieved and a little sore. However, a few days later you realize you are sick. This could be a common cold or a Hospital-Acquired Infection (HAI) from your surgery!

A Hospital-Acquired Infection (HAI), which are also known as nosocomial, is an infection that occurs in a patient during the time they are under the care of a hospital. An HAI can occur for a number of different reasons. About 1 in 10 of the people admitted to a hospital will contract an HAI. If you think about that on a local level it seems like a very small number, but think of it as a worldwide or the whole United States, that is kind of scary! The Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that in 2014 there were 722,000 HAIs in the United States and 75,000 patients with HAIs died during their hospitalizations.

Yet, the problem is, most people are unaware of this problem. Most of the time, these infections are totally avoidable as well. The infections are commonly associated with surgeries and the devices that are used in these medical procedures.  While HAIs will never go away, there are certain surfaces that can be used to help with these infections. This is what we thought about when we were creating our FlowCARE Nurse Servers. FlowCARE is constructed of either healthcare grade laminate (HPL) or anti-microbial powder-coated steel.

There are an array of different choices one can make for their hospital surfaces. However, like most items we buy or use, there is always a better option.

  • Steel: This is an affordable solution to use in hospitals and appears in a number of different items in hospitals. It is a extremely hard surface that can withstand heavy use in a variety of different temperatures without breaking. The most important part is that it is non-porous, which means liquids do not leak into the steel. This means it is easier to clean than other surfaces.
  • Laminate: This is one of the most affordable solutions to use in a hospital setting. A laminate surface is made of layers of compressed paper and resin, which is a liquid glue, and all the layers are heated together to bond into what is know as laminate.  These surfaces are popular because they are cheaper and come in a variety of colors and patterns. They are also non-porous which means liquids do not soak up into the laminate. This keeps bacteria and germs at a minimum.

HAIs can be deadly, but hospitals can take precautions to prevent these infections. This means sterilizing all materials before a surgery and personnel simply washing their hands. This is why at Moduflex, LLC, we offer our storage units in antimicrobial powder-coated steel and healthcare-grade laminate. Both of these surfaces can withstand harsh cleaning and last for years at a time.

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At Moduflex, LLC, we know that #StorageMatters. When Moduflex, LLC, was designed it was designed with Directors of Nursing and Nurses in mind. For more information on Moduflex, LLC and what we can offer, contact us today!

Updated: 3 Ways Nurses Help Fight The Flu and Cold Season!

Updated: 3 Ways Nurses Help Fight The Flu and Cold Season!

Achoo, the cold and flu season is in full swing! 

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Factors to consider in hospital design

Factors to consider in hospital design

Every hospital is unique, so the way they are designed should be too. These are among some of the most complex building types which have different requirements than other spaces like restaurants and retail spaces.

Regardless of their location, size or budget, hospitals should strive to integrate these attributes. 

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What nurses can do to prevent hospital acquired infections

What nurses can do to prevent hospital acquired infections

Hospitals work hard each and every day of the year to heal vulnerable patients. With many patients comes many medical supplies, but medical supplies must be reused and cleaned after each patient to ensure proper sanitation. However, this is not always the case, as hospital acquired infections (HAI’s) account for 99,000 deaths in United States hospitals each yea

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